25 August 2014

Car Purchasing 101: How to convince your significant other

It's hard to tell your significant other that you want to buy another car when the garage is packed full, or perhaps when you have unfinished projects and the house could use a few repairs. Time and time again the phrase “It's easier to ask for forgiveness than permission” has proven to be a myth, leaving many poor souls trapped between a rock and a hard place. How should you approach the situation, you ask? Well, as an avid car gal, I’m here to shed some light on the issue.

Make your case: If you have to, write it all down. Listing the reasons why you want the car — why you deserve to have this particular car — will show him or her how much you really need it.  You only live once, and you work hard every day to take care of the family; a classic car is the ultimate reward for a job well done. Most importantly, don’t forget to slip in a heart-melting “because I love you.”

Acknowledge concerns: Your significant other is sure to have concerns; otherwise you wouldn’t be searching for ways around them! Budget, space and life events such as a child’s wedding or even a baby on the way have the potential to derail your attempts to purchase your dream classic.  Try to preempt any concerns that he or she may have, and explain your solutions in a non-argumentative sort of way. Have a shield ready in case this step backfires.

Prove that it is an investment: Show your better half the trending values of the vehicle in question using Hagerty Valuation Tools and indicate that your "sweat equity" will build an additional asset for your family.

Tell them it’s really for both of you: Let him or her know it’s not just for you; it’s a way for the two of you to spend time together by getting out of the house to enjoy a cruise. Also, if you have children, imagine the influence a classic could have on their lives!

And most importantly: Never, ever add up the receipts. You must never lie, but if you’re asked how much you have invested in the car, you need to be able to honestly say: "I don't know, dear; I haven’t totaled the receipts."

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