17 October 2014

Contributors to the 2014 Winter Issue

Jim Koscs
Is an automotive marketing, public relations and editorial writer who has produced brochures, executive speeches, press kits and more for BMW, Ferrari, Jaguar, Porsche, Lexus, Mercedes-Benz, Subaru and others. He also regularly authors collector car features for the New York Times, including the “Auto Ego“ column. You've seen his work in the Hagerty enewsletter, and he makes his magazine debut in this issue with a look at the wildly outlandish trappings of 1980s neo-classics.

Norman Mayersohn
Took his drag racing urges to the track in the 1970s with his first serious class racer, a 1965 Chevrolet Chevelle station wagon in the O/Stock class. Modest success was followed by a staff position at Car Craft magazine and a stretch as the driver of a Super Modified ‘67 Camaro that earned a pair of West Coast points championships. He has been at the the New York Times since 2003, where he is deputy editor of the paper’s Automobiles section. Here he profiles Grumpy Jenkins' innovative Toy X.

Andrew Trahan
Was Motor City born and raised, and he grew up around the notion that classic cars were king. He has made it his job to photograph cars, new and old, in ways that not only show off the sheet metal but eternalize it. When he is not behind the camera, he is working on classics of his own, including traditional 1950s and ’60s American customs, with the occasional European in the mix. He has shot several features for us in the past, and for this issue he captured our cover story as well as Autorama Detroit.

Emily Thomas
Is the publishing and circulation coordinator for Hagerty Classic Cars and does all of the behind-the-scenes work to make sure the magazine comes together smoothly and gets into your hands on time. She is a native of Traverse City, Michigan, where she grew up sailing on the waters of Grand Traverse Bay with her family. Three years ago she suggested we consider a story on ice boating; little did she know she’d be the one tackling her fears of excessive speed and certain death in order to write it.

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