22 October 2014

Five Of The Most Elegant American Cars

Poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow famously wrote, “In character, in manner, in style, in all the things, the supreme excellence is simplicity.” And one could argue that the same is true in automotive design. American car design of the 1950s-1970s was beloved for its flamboyance; here are five post-war cars that swam against the stream of fins, scoops, chrome and decals and were memorable for their elegant simplicity.

  1. 1963-65 Buick Riviera: The 1963 Riviera was the result of GM design head Bill Mitchell’s desire to produce something that was a combination of a Rolls-Royce and a Ferrari. Whether he succeeded in that odd mash-up is debatable, but the 1963-65 Riv was a thing of great elegance and simplicity, particularly the 1965 model with hidden headlamps. Introduced at the height of Camelot, it was as elegant as Jackie Kennedy herself.

  2. 1956-57 Continental Mk II: The Continental was emphatically not a Lincoln, even though it shared the name of numerous products of that division of the Ford Motor Company. For two brief years, Continental was a division unto itself and the Mk II may well have been the most elegant post-war car built in America. Costing the then-unheard-of sum of $10,000 (the equivalent of almost $87,000 in today’s money), the care and craftsmanship that went into each car ensured that Ford still lost money on each one.  Elvis, Frank Sinatra and Elizabeth Taylor were all Continental owners. The Hilton Head Island Motoring Festival and Concours d’ Elegance is featuring three examples built for the Ford family at this year’s show on Nov. 2.

  3. 1953 Studebaker Regal Starlight coupe: Famous industrial designer Raymond Loewy put together a team of talented designers that included Robert Bourke to design a car like no other of the 1950s. Low, sleek and incredibly elegant, the Regal Starlight is largely forgotten today by all but the most diehard car collectors and fans of the long-defunct Studebaker Corporation of South Bend, Ind.

  4. 1975-79 Cadillac Seville: In a decade not necessarily known for elegance (heaven knows how many high school kids rode to prom in dad’s Seville wearing powder blue polyester tuxedos), the Seville stood out against the odds as a particularly elegant design.  Not only was it handicapped by being a product of the 1970s, but it was the first time that a substantial number of Chevrolet components were used in a Cadillac (it shared the same underpinnings as the Nova). But this was no Cimarron. The first-generation Seville was elegant, restrained and every bit a Cadillac. Although it was the smallest car in the lineup, it was the most expensive and it looked the part.

  5. 1956 Chrysler 300B: The first of the 300 “letter-series” (the 1955 C-300 was never actually called the “300A”), it was probably the prettiest Mopar design of the 1950s. Its pillarless hardtop design and restrained use of chrome were wildly inconsistent with the over-the-top performance that the car was capable of delivering from its 355-hp, 354-cubic-inch Hemi V-8.  It terrorized NASCAR back in the day.

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